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Define a word game

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Re: Define a word game

PostAuthor: Lúthien » Mon Mar 28, 2011 6:28 pm

órerámar wrote:Hi John,

I enjoyed your solution, because there are elements in it that meet part of what the word stands for. Over-fond of Turkish baths conveys the idea of great pleasure and I wonder whether you are aware of the part in my word that has this meaning or is it just a nice coincidence. Water although indirectly is also there !
:-)


Hi Orerámar,
I think I may miss something but I don't understand what you mean to say here :dontknow:


And what's the new word?
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Re: Define a word game

PostAuthor: órerámar » Mon Mar 28, 2011 7:07 pm

Hi Lúthien,

As I said in John's explanation there is a notion of "pleasure" if someone is over-fond of something. In kefkayer, the element "kef" is from the arabic kif or kiff (also written keif), a word that has entered the French slang with the meaning "pleasure, be fond of" and which gives:

le kiffeur m. noun a person taking intense pleasure in something
la kiffeuse f. noun same as above
kiffer verb take pleasure
le kiff m. noun intense pleasure

and if you ask me what the exact translation of a "Párendil" is, my answer is:

Un kiffeur ou une kiffeuse qui kiffe le plus grand kiff "des mots".
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Re: Define a word game

PostAuthor: Lúthien » Mon Mar 28, 2011 9:26 pm

Ahhhhh I see. I get it.
But I was wondering if you put that association into the word consciously, when you first proposed it?
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Re: Define a word game

PostAuthor: órerámar » Tue Mar 29, 2011 5:43 pm

Lúthien wrote:Ahhhhh I see. I get it.
But I was wondering if you put that association into the word consciously, when you first proposed it?


More or less. I toyed with KAY KAYAY KAYER and wanted something that sounded good with a similar sound. KEYF - KEF imposed itself.
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Re: Define a word game

PostAuthor: Lúthien » Fri Apr 01, 2011 2:25 pm

Ok ... but meanwhile, I'm still waiting for a new word ....

*yawn*
:-#
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Re: Define a word game

PostAuthor: John P. Hanlon » Thu Apr 21, 2011 1:06 pm

If anyone's still interested, might I suggest "talihoism" (yes, I know its an awful pun! S) )
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Re: Define a word game

PostAuthor: órerámar » Wed Apr 27, 2011 2:26 pm

John P. Hanlon wrote:If anyone's still interested, might I suggest "talihoism" (yes, I know its an awful pun! S) )


Great, that's a challenging one.
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Re: Define a word game

PostAuthor: órerámar » Sun May 29, 2011 9:39 pm

John P. Hanlon wrote:If anyone's still interested, might I suggest "talihoism" (yes, I know its an awful pun! S) )


Looks as if it's no use to wait longer - no one wants to play :( so here is my "talihoism"

Talihoism : is the belief in a law of punishment that refuses the eye for an eye principle at a time when the law of talion was still in use. The etymology of talihoism goes back such a long way, that one has practically to start with “once upon a time....”. Talihoism is composed of “tali” (feet) and “fô” (interjection of displeasure/dissent meaning “nay, no” which in a compound becomes “hô” or “ho”) in an ancient language called Quenya. Quite mysteriously some vocabulary entered Old French, where those two words became an –ism “talihoism” which meant “no to the talion”. At that time the lex talionis had not yet the latin etymology and the use of “talion” (génitive of tali = of the feet) can probably be equated with the German proverb “Die Strafe folgt auf dem Fusse” (Punishment will be swift or literally punishment follows close at the heals). When punishment follows swift without proper trial, retaliation corresponding in degree and kind to the offense done would often be the result – hence the law of talion. Today the etymology of talion is derived from the Latin “talis” which means “such” and talihoism has completely fallen out of use.
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Re: Define a word game

PostAuthor: Eryniel » Mon May 30, 2011 1:24 am

Nice answer órerámar :)
I do enjoy reading what people come up with, but alas, I feel not competent enough for coming up with a convincing ethymology or even linguistical explanation... :dontknow:
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Re: Define a word game

PostAuthor: John P. Hanlon » Mon May 30, 2011 12:34 pm

Very good Oreramar! :D I had no idea there was so much to the word. What linguistic treasures we possess without knowing it. ;)
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